Interview Tips

4 Steps, beyond the Obvious, to Ace an Interview

Most interview preparation begins and ends with revisiting past work and doing a read up on the industry. What a lot of brilliant and capable candidates fail to understand is that in an interview people are not just looking for the person best qualified for the job but also someone who can fit in with the culture.

Let us take the example of Mark. He is a job seeker who has been preparing with a peer group for his interviews. This group works together on their elevator pitch and delivery of all their content. Mark now has an interview lined up and it is with a company he knows little about. In a conversation with a friend, he mentions that he is going to keep an open mind and let the interviewers tell him more about the company. After which he will consider if this is a good opportunity.

Do you see what might be the problem here? Clearly, Mark is well prepared with his content and has worked on the delivery. But he does not demonstrate any interest in the company or the values he represents.

So if you are Mark, here are 4 things you can do to ace that interview:

1. Research the Company The first step to this is going through the company’s website and identifying things you can talk about. Check different websites to understand the reputation of the company. Understand the financials by visiting sites give you the comparisons of balance sheets. This will give you an insight into the current state of the company and add dimensions to your conversation with the interviewers. Also, LinkedIn is a great place to observe conversations about the company.

2. Review the Job Description/ Advertisement Have a narrative on each point listed in the JD shows how you are the best fit for the job. This also allows you to clearly tie your achievements to the requirements. Be prepared to speak about the obstacles you have faced and how you have resolved them.

3. Advanced People Search on LinkedIn Make sure you have made yourself “Totally Anonymous” before you do check people on LinkedIn. Look for current employees in the department of the company you are would be working and review as many profiles as possible. Make note of anything might have in common with these people, for example, you might be from the same university or might have worked for the same company or might have a similar skill set. This gives you a tip-off about the kind of people who are hired for the division. You can use this information to subtly mention why you will be a good fit.

4. Prepare Intelligent Questions If you can find an answer to any question by preliminary research, it is not an intelligent question. If you wish to ask about a certain process followed in the company, it is better to ask, “To do this task do you follow this or that method?” Display your enthusiasm by asking, what contributions you can make to the company in the first 6 months or how you can earn a stellar review in a year’s time. If as a job seeker you approach an interview with the right attitude and effective research and couple it with enthusiasm and clear communication, you maximise your chances of nailing it. Being prepared is being lucky. All the best!

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4 Steps, beyond the Obvious, to Ace an Interview

Most interview preparation begins and ends with revisiting past work and doing a read up on the industry. What a lot of brilliant and capable candidates fail to understand is that in an interview people are not just looking for the person best qualified for the job but also someone who can fit in with the culture.

Let us take the example of Mark. He is a job seeker who has been preparing with a peer group for his interviews. This group works together on their elevator pitch and delivery of all their content. Mark now has an interview lined up and it is with a company he knows little about. In a conversation with a friend, he mentions that he is going to keep an open mind and let the interviewers tell him more about the company. After which he will consider if this is a good opportunity.

Do you see what might be the problem here? Clearly, Mark is well prepared with his content and has worked on the delivery. But he does not demonstrate any interest in the company or the values he represents.

So if you are Mark, here are 4 things you can do to ace that interview:

1. Research the Company The first step to this is going through the company’s website and identifying things you can talk about. Check different websites to understand the reputation of the company. Understand the financials by visiting sites give you the comparisons of balance sheets. This will give you an insight into the current state of the company and add dimensions to your conversation with the interviewers. Also, LinkedIn is a great place to observe conversations about the company.

2. Review the Job Description/ Advertisement Have a narrative on each point listed in the JD shows how you are the best fit for the job. This also allows you to clearly tie your achievements to the requirements. Be prepared to speak about the obstacles you have faced and how you have resolved them.

3. Advanced People Search on LinkedIn Make sure you have made yourself “Totally Anonymous” before you do check people on LinkedIn. Look for current employees in the department of the company you are would be working and review as many profiles as possible. Make note of anything might have in common with these people, for example, you might be from the same university or might have worked for the same company or might have a similar skill set. This gives you a tip-off about the kind of people who are hired for the division. You can use this information to subtly mention why you will be a good fit.

4. Prepare Intelligent Questions If you can find an answer to any question by preliminary research, it is not an intelligent question. If you wish to ask about a certain process followed in the company, it is better to ask, “To do this task do you follow this or that method?” Display your enthusiasm by asking, what contributions you can make to the company in the first 6 months or how you can earn a stellar review in a year’s time. If as a job seeker you approach an interview with the right attitude and effective research and couple it with enthusiasm and clear communication, you maximise your chances of nailing it. Being prepared is being lucky. All the best!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *